Microsoft
 
Microsoft

WebRTC close to tipping point as Cisco, Microsoft announce products

It was all the way back in the Spring of 2011 that Google released WebRTC, its nascent real-time, browser-based, HTML5-powered, no-plugin-required video chat project to the public. In the three and a half years since, the Internet Engineering Task Force and the W3C have been working together to try to formalize the standard, prepare the stable 1.0 release, and get it ready for prime time.

Microsoft Rebrands Lync as Skype for Business

In a blog post last week, Microsoft’s corporate VP for Skype Gurdeep Pall revealed changes for Microsoft Lync with a new name, a new user interface, and new features. In his blog, Pall said, "In the first half of 2015, the next version of Lync will become Skype for Business with a new client experience, new server release and updates to the service in Office 365."

Microsoft goes open source, cross-platform with .NET developer tech

Microsoft is planning to open source the full server-side .NET core stack and to take that open-sourced .NET core to Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, alongside Windows. Microsoft officials announced the company's latest plans for .NET, a framework created by Microsoft that developers can use to build applications for Windows, on the opening day of the Connect(); developer-focused event on Wednesday.

Microsoft: Now you can create, edit on Office mobile apps for free

Microsoft's new Office mobile apps comes to the iPhone. When you're mobile, you likely want robust, free software that works with a lot of apps and that can be accessed anywhere. So far, Microsoft has failed to embrace those concepts -- but it's working to change that.

The software giant on Thursday unveiled a handful of changes to its Office software on smartphones and tablets running Apple and Google's operating systems, refreshing its Word, PowerPoint and Excel apps to make them friendlier for the mobile age.

Microsoft to marry Office with Dropbox for cloud productivity

In the latest example of Microsoft partnering with a major competitor, the company has struck a deal with Dropbox to improve interoperability between Office and Dropbox's cloud storage and file sharing services for consumers and businesses.

The partnership, announced Tuesday, creates a "coopetition" relationship, since Microsoft's OneDrive and OneDrive for Business compete against Dropbox's namesake consumer service and against Dropbox for Business.

Microsoft gives Office 365 customers unlimited OneDrive storage

Microsoft will no longer try to "one up" competitors in cloud storage, opting instead to eliminate the ceiling for consumer and business subscribers of its Office 365 suites, a move that will put it on par with some vendors and ahead of others.

All Office 365 editions will include unlimited capacity in OneDrive and OneDrive for Business as Microsoft now begins a gradual rollout of this enhancement that will continue into next year. OneDrive and OneDrive for Business are designed as file repositories for individual users.

Office 365 gets built-in mobile device tools

Microsoft is building a subset of the mobile-device-management (MDM) features it provides with its Intune service into Office 365 for free.
Microsoft execs unveiled the addition of the MDM service for Office 365 at the kick-off keynote during Tech Ed Europe in Barcelona, Spain on October 28.

Office 365 admins get spreadsheet search help

Microsoft has switched on special search features in Office 365 designed to help IT administrators keep tabs on employees' spreadsheets, a task becoming more difficult and more important in enterprises.

The new capabilities are aimed at Office 365 customers who are having a hard time manually maintaining a comprehensive and up-to-date inventory of critical spreadsheets used for sensitive business processes.

Microsoft Offers Cloud Device to Battle Google and Amazon

Microsoft will soon offer a hardware appliance that will let businesses run something akin to its Azure cloud computing service inside their own data centers.

IBM and Microsoft pledge to make their clouds compatible

Although fierce rivals in the market for cloud computing services, IBM and Microsoft have pledged to make their technologies interoperable in the cloud for the sake of their users.

On Wednesday, the companies jointly announced that many Microsoft enterprise products would run on IBM's infrastructure and platform services, and that many key IBM middleware products would be available for use on Microsoft Azure.

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