Microsoft's New Devices Put Windows 10 on Any Screen

Last year, Microsoft introduced the Surface Pro 3, a thin and lightweight hybrid tablet-like device that the company famously claimed “could replace your laptop.” A lot has changed since then: Windows 8.1 has been put out to pasture, Microsoft has anointed Windows 10 as the one OS to run on all of its devices, and everyone from Apple to HP to Lenovo has trotted out their own light and powerful “lapblets.”

Microsoft unveils Surface Pro 4 tablet as latest laptop killer

Microsoft has beefed up its Surface Pro tablet lineup to better compete with traditional laptops. The Surface Pro 4, unveiled Tuesday at Microsoft's Windows 10 event, has a 12.3-inch screen, only slightly larger than the 12-inch screen on the Surface Pro 3. The bezel is smaller, however, meaning there's more space for the screen itself. The screen, with a 2,736x1,824-pixel resolution, also sports 5 million pixels with 267 pixels per inch.

Microsoft's Surface Book Looks Like the Ultimate Hybrid PC


Along with a more-powerful version of its Surface Pro laptop/tablet hybrid, Microsoft unveiled a brand-new addition to the Surface lineup. Microsoft’s Panos Panay described it as the “ultimate laptop,” and the spec sheet, at least, seems to bear that out. It’s also the first time Microsoft has made a laptop on its own.

And spoiler alert: It also detaches from its keyboard to become a standalone Surface tablet.

Microsoft stays in the on-premises email server game with launch of Exchange 2016

Microsoft has been aggressively pushing its cloud services for applications such as email, but it also remains committed to selling software that customers run in their own data centers. That's why, on Thursday morning, the company released Exchange Server 2016.

Microsoft reshuffles into 3 businesses for financial reporting

Microsoft today changed how it will report its financial performance, reducing the number of operating divisions to three, in an effort to align with CEO Satya Nadella's emphasis on the cloud and productivity platforms, and opportunities to reap revenue from customers after they've moved to Windows 10.

The three operating segments -- Intelligent Cloud, Productivity and Business Processes and More Personal Computing -- replace six earlier divisions, which were roughly organized on a consumer versus commercial basis.

Microsoft Finally Gets That It Won't Win the Smartphone War

On Wednesday, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella emailed staffers to update them on a series of executive changes at the company—changes that seem to have been a long time coming.

Microsoft and Google in drive to boost Web app speed to that of native apps


The project, WebAssembly, aims to compile the source code for the programmatic parts of Web applications so they can be processed by the browser more quickly.

Microsoft doubles down on Office apps, services for Android tablets

Microsoft is adding 20 more global and local device makers to the list of companies that are bundling Office apps and services with their Android devices.

The expanded list of companies signing pre-installation deals with Microsoft include LG and Sony, according to a blog post on Tuesday announcing the list.

Office 365 customers pay Microsoft up to 80% more over long haul

When Microsoft turns a customer into a subscriber, it gets 1.2 to 1.8 times the revenue compared to old-school licensing.


Moving a corporate customer from "transactional" purchases of Office -- the once-traditional practice of purchasing one-time, perpetual licenses that let workers use the suite as long as their firms want -- to Office 365 rent-not-buy subscriptions results in almost a doubling of revenue for Microsoft.

Gartner shows two-horse race in IaaS cloud: AWS and Microsoft Azure

Research firm Gartner's annual report card on the public IaaS cloud computing market shows there is one clear leader -- Amazon Web Services -- and another clear challenger, Microsoft Azure. And then there is everyone else.

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