Microsoft
 
Microsoft

One Windows, all devices: The new Microsoft app strategy unveiled

Microsoft announced its Universal Windows Apps technology, which is intended to streamline the process of building applications that can run on Windows Phones, Xbox game consoles, and the Metro environment in Intel-based Windows 8.1 tablets and PCs. Previously, developers had to create separate apps for the forthcoming Windows Phone 8.1, for Xbox, and for the tablet/PC Metro, which made it less attractive for developers given the relatively small size of those two markets.

Microsoft Changes Its Tune With Free Version of Windows

Microsoft took an enormous step forward this morning. It unveiled a free version of its Windows operating system.

Microsoft slashes Azure prices, introduces new basic tier

Microsoft said Monday it was cutting prices of its Azure cloud services to match the prices of competitor Amazon Web Services in the latest in a price war in cloud services.

Besides introducing a new tier of general-purpose services, Microsoft also announced a move to region-specific pricing to help customers save money, as some workloads may not be dependent on locatio

The company is cutting prices on compute by up to 35 percent while the prices of its storage service will be down by up to 65 percent.

Microsoft's Satya Nadella puts the cloud front and center

While the buzz centers on Office for the iPad, the real message in Satya Nadella's coming-out party was the transformation of Microsoft to a cloud behemoth

From the start, the change in tone was striking. For Satya Nadella's first big dog-and-pony show, 52 days into his tenure as CEO, he did what his predecessor Steve Ballmer seemed constitutionally unable to do: Declare unequivocally that cloud and mobile were first, not just for Microsoft platforms, but across every device.

With Office for iPad, Microsoft pushing subscription-first future

Microsoft's "freemium" switch for Office on iOS is one of the last remaining keys to the company's biggest pricing change in years. It's been a long battle, but Microsoft seems to have conceded the fight to keep Apple's hands off proceeds from its mobile software.

Microsoft's Lync surging as PBX choice in North America

Microsoft's Lync communications platform is making big gains as the IP PBX of choice, particularly in North America and particularly among larger businesses, Enterprise Connect attendees were told.

Lync ranks 11th worldwide among IP PBX vendors, but comes in No.3 in North America among businesses with more than 100 phone extensions, according to Peter Hale, principal analyst with MZA, speaking at the conference.

Microsoft sketches ambitious enhancements for Office 365

Microsoft didn't disappoint with the new and improved capabilities it announced and demonstrated for Office 365 this week, but how well they work in the real world remains to be seen.

At its SharePoint Conference in Las Vegas, Microsoft laid out its vision for making Office 365 a more intelligent collaboration suite via new social interactions, APIs (application programming interfaces) and machine learning capabilities.

Microsoft relaunches Office Web Apps as Office Online

The online version of Microsoft Office has a new name, along with some new features intended to streamline certain activities.

Why the name change? In a blog post on Wednesday, Office Online product marketing manager Amanda Lefebvre acknowledged that the name Office Web Apps confused users. Some apparently thought they had venture to an app store to find the software and then manually install it.

Office for tablets: Microsoft's Godot

Apple launched the iPad four years ago, igniting a tablet frenzy that altered personal computing at home and at work, but Microsoft has yet to release an Office version for touchscreen devices.

Much is made about the absence of full, native versions of Office for iPads and Android tablets, but Microsoft hasn't even readied one yet for its own touch-optimized Windows 8 OS, released in October 2012, thus depriving its own Surface tablets of a great sales incentive.

Microsoft pushes ahead with Skype-Lync integration

Microsoft will demonstrate how Lync and Skype users will be able to communicate via video conferencing, the next stage of the integration between its enterprise unified communications server and its consumer IM and IP telephony network. The new integration will be shown at the Lync Conference, in Las Vegas and will be attended by almost 2,000 customers and partners, according to Microsoft.

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